Top 3 Reasons to NOT Become a DVC Member

I am not a DVCmember. I wish I were a Disney Vacation Club member… my husband, however (who despite loving Disney), does not share this dream. In our fierce negotiations we have subsequently created a pros and cons column. Here are our top three reasons NOT to take the plunge.

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Buying into DVC costs… A LOT! Photo by WDW Shutterbug.

1. Cost: The initial outlay is thousands of dollars. Currently, the cheapest direct buy from Disney is around $13,500 for 100 points at the cheapest Walt Disney World property, which would be Old Key West or Saratoga Springs Resorts. 100 points is the minimum buy-in allowed when purchasing directly through Disney. Point costs range from $135-$170 per point.

Then of course, there are the annual maintenance fees that frequently increase (last year on average by 3%), currently at $5-$6 per point, per year. They cover administration expenses, refurbishment costs, property taxes and operation expenses. It would only make sense if you planned to exclusively stay at deluxe accommodations for week-long visits each year, for many years.

Say goodbye to savings if you buy DVC! Photo by WDW Shutterbug.

Say goodbye to savings if you buy DVC! Photo by WDW Shutterbug.

2. No Promotions: Disney is expensive, but they also frequently run some great money saving promotions at all accommodation levels. As a DVC member using points to reserve your stay, you would not be eligible to apply any of these to your reservation. For example, while DVC owners can add the Dining Plan to a reservation, if it were being offered on a FREE DINING promotion, members would not be able to take advantage of that.

Why buy DVC points when you can rent them? Photo by Disney Photosnapper.

Why buy DVC points when you can rent them? Photo by Disney Photosnapper.

3. You can RENT DVC points for close to half the cost: Whether you opt to look for a private rental or use a broker like David’s DVC Rentals, you can typically snag a deluxe stay at one of Disney’s DVC properties for half the going rate. DVC members, who have points they will not be using, often put them up for sale at a significantly reduced cost, allowing non-members to rent them and stay deluxe for a fraction of the rack rate. This is the biggest point of contention in our debate. We’ve rented DVC points and it worked out great! Unfortunately, that did not help my argument.

So, what is your top reason to say NO to becoming a member of the Disney Vacation Club?

To read more about the Disney Vacation Club – check out our January issue by clicking here!

For more great advice on DVC or your next Disney vacation, join Kathleen and her team of expert panelists at a free, online Get Down to Disness Meeting